Washington Update

Supreme Court Rules on States’ Right to Prohibit Consideration of Race in Admissions

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On April 22, the United States Supreme Court issued an opinion in its ruling on Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action.  The Court’s decision upheld a constitutional amendment that Michigan voters approved to ban the consideration of race and gender in public education. The Michigan ballot initiative, known as Proposal 2, was passed in 2006 by 58 percent of voters.  

Primary Care Bill Would Expand Access to Dental Services

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has introduced a bill that would expand access to primary care through workforce initiatives, enhanced reimbursements and increased accountability for Graduate Medical Education (GME) funds.

Congress Shows Bipartisan Support for Title VII Programs

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Elected officials on both sides of the aisle have signaled their support for federal health care workforce programs as their colleagues on Capitol Hill gear up to begin work on appropriations bills for FY15.

Bills to Expand Biomedical Research Funding

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Rep. Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA), a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has introduced a bill that would increase U.S. investments in biomedical research. The Helping Encourage Advancements in Lifesaving Science or America HEALS Act would create a mandatory trust fund dedicated to supporting research at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Defense Health Program and the Veterans Medical & Prosthetics Research Program. The legislation would increase funding for these agencies and programs at a rate of GDP-indexed inflation plus 5% every year.

Affordable Care Act: Implementation Update

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As the deadline to sign up for health insurance coverage through the new federal and state marketplaces neared on March 31, a surge in enrollments carried the number of purchasers over the 6 million mark—inching closer to the Obama Administration’s initial target of 7 million. 

Congressional Resources

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For those interested in following the congressional proceedings, please access the U.S. House or Senate by way of the following links: U.S. House of Representatives: House website U.S. Senate: Senate website ADEA-AGR Twitter Account: ADEAAGR For the latest information on issues affecting dental education and dental and craniofacial research in Washington and the state legislatures, please follow us on Twitter at ADEAAGR. There is much to “tweet” about.

Congressional Budget Office Report Fuels ACA Debate

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A February 4 report by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) on the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the U.S. labor market set off a firestorm on Capitol Hill when it estimated that by 2024 some 2.5 million Americans who would have previously counted on a job for their health insurance will no longer decide to work or will shorten their hours. 

Bipartisan Effort Extends the Debt Limit Until March 2015

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January marked the fourth time in three years that Congress faced a potential debt-limit crisis, but this time brinksmanship was avoided. By mid-February, a bipartisan effort extended the well beyond the upcoming November elections—and the Tea Party received a strong rebuke. 

Portions of Employer Health Insurance Mandate Postponed

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The Obama Administration last month announced it would further delay the requirement that certain businesses provide health insurance to their employees, in some cases postponing the obligation until 2016, a full two years after the date originally set by the law. The Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) so-called “employer mandate,” which applies to businesses with 50 or more employees, had originally been set to take effect in January, 2014, but was postponed until 2015 following pressure from the business community. In a February 10 announcement, the U.S. Treasury Department said it would again relax the requirements. Businesses with between 50 and 99 employees will now have until 2016 to provide health insurance to their employees. In addition, businesses with more than 100 employees will now be allowed to comply over a two-year period. Most businesses with more than 100 employees already offer health insurance, the Treasury Department noted. But under the new rules, those that do not already provide health insurance will be required to offer it to just 70% of their employees by 2015 and 95% in 2016 and beyond. While only 2% of employers have more than 100 workers, these companies account for 66% of the private sector work force. The vast majority of businesses in the United States employ fewer than 50 people, and under the ACA they have never been subject to an employer mandate, something the Treasury Department stressed when making its announcement. “While about 96% of employers are not subject to the employer responsibility provision, for those employers that are, we will continue to make the compliance process simpler and easier to navigate,” said Assistant Secretary for Tax Policy Mark J. Mazur. Republicans on Capitol Hill pilloried the news of the postponement of the employer mandate, accusing the Obama Administration of changing the law unilaterally. Administration officials countered that they have wide latitude to grant what is known as “transition relief” in implementing the law. The announcement of the delay in the employer mandate has added to the pressure on the Administration to relax the health insurance obligations for individuals as well, or at least postpone the enforcement of a tax penalty for people who forego coverage. Health policy analysts, however, note that the employer and individual mandates have different functions, and that the individual mandate is crucial for the solvency of the ACA. Unless enough healthy individuals sign up, insurance companies will not be able to afford the law’s more expensive changes: a ban on denying insurance because of pre-existing conditions and a ban on dropping people from a policy when they get sick.

Senate Debates Veterans Health Bill with Academic Dentistry Provisions

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On February 26, the Senate began floor debate on the Comprehensive Veterans Health and Benefits and Military Pay Restoration Act of 2014 (S.1982), which includes a number of provisions impacting academic dentistry.    Namely, Title III of Subtitle E (Dental Care Eligibility Expansion and Enhancement) in the bill provides: The Secretary of Veterans Affairs may furnish restorative “dental services and treatment, and dental appliances” to veterans Authorizes a three-year pilot program expanding dental care to all enrolled veterans at 16 sites nationwide. The Secretary is directed to carry out a dental health educational program informing veterans on options for accessing dental care, including obtaining low or no-cost dental care through dental schools or Federally Qualified Heath Clinics (FQHC). The proposed legislation authorizes $305 million in FY15, to be available for 5 years, to carry out these provisions.   Additionally, Title II of the bill deals with Education Matters: It requires that, beginning on July 1, 2015, public institutions of higher education must charge veterans in-state tuition and fees regardless of the veteran’s state of residence. In addition, it extends and expands the work-study program through June 30, 2015. The ADEA Advocacy and Governmental Relations team will continue to monitor progress on this proposed legislation and its impact on academic dentistry.

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